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Ed & Hazel Richmond Public Library

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Expanding Minds. Empowering People. Enriching Community.

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In striving for public service excellence, the Ed and Hazel Richmond Public Library is a welcoming community center whose staff, resources, programs, and services provide for the needs of our diverse community.

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What's New in the Library?

Check out our newest titles!

New Titles in the Library

Adult Fiction

New Titles in the Library

Adult Fiction

The Institute – Stephen King

The Testaments – Margaret Atwood

Land of the Wolves – Craig Johnson

Death in Focus – Anne Perry

What Rose Forgot – Nevada Barr

The Titanic Secret – Clive Cussler

Young Adult/Junior Fiction

Tales of the Haunted Deep – Brenda Z. Guiberson

Space Quest Jump to Jupiter – Peter Lock 

Fuzzy Mud – Louis Sachar

Featured Author of the Month


Stephen Edwin King is an American author of horror, supernatural fiction. King was born September 21, 1947, in Portland, Maine.  When Stephen King was two years old, his father left the family under the pretense of "going to buy a pack of cigarettes", leaving his mother to raise Stephen and his older brother, David, by herself, sometimes under great financial strain. The family moved to De Pere, Wisconsin, Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Stratford, Connecticut. When King was 11, the family returned to Durham, Maine, where his mother cared for her parents until their deaths. She then became a caregiver in a local residential facility for the mentally challenged. King was raised Methodist and remains religious as an adult. 

King related in detail his primary inspiration for writing horror fiction in his non-fiction Danse Macabre (1981), in a chapter titled "An Annoying Autobiographical Pause". King compares his uncle's successfully dowsing for water using the bough of an apple branch with the sudden realization of what he wanted to do for a living. That inspiration occurred while browsing through an attic with his elder brother, when King uncovered a paperback version of an H. P. Lovecraft collection of short stories he remembers as The Lurker in the Shadows, that had belonged to his father. King told Barnes & Noble Studios during a 2009 interview, "I knew that I'd found home when I read that book."

King has received Bram Stoker Awards, World Fantasy Awards, and British Fantasy Society Awards. His novella The Way Station (1980) was a Nebula Award novelette nominee. In 2003, the National Book Foundation awarded him the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. His short story "The Man in the Black Suit" (1994) received the O. Henry Award. He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his entire oeuvre, such as the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement (2004), the Canadian Booksellers Association Lifetime Achievement Award (2007), and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America (2007). In 2015, King was awarded with a National Medal of Arts from the United States National Endowment for the Arts for his contributions to literature. He has been described as the "King of Horror".


-Wikipedia



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